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Our Definition

Sustainable fashion is built with care. Made thoughtfully, consciously and with high-quality materials, it will withstand time and wear. It will do no harm to the hands that made it. From design to factory to hanger, it has nothing to hide. It’s impact on the planet is minimal, and thus means the world.

Small Batch

The brand produces its goods in small amounts, which uses less energy, creates less excess waste and creates a more unique good. Small batch production allows for more control over the number of materials used and will lower the amount of waste, energy and resources being used.

Charitable

The brand gives back to many different social and environmental causes. An environmental charity such as The Canopy Project, plants one tree saving around 48 pounds of carbon dioxide each year.

Locally Made

Based locally in relation to the designer and where their supply chain is located to support the local economy. Creating a supply chain in a local community not only helps the economy and increase work opportunities but also reduces the energy use and resources associated with typical shipping.

Recycled

Using materials that have been made from fibers from old fabrics, post/pre-industrial waste or plastic bottles that would otherwise end up in landfills. Implementing recycled materials, such as Econyl (recycled nylon made out of discarded fishing nets), can reduce the overall global warming impact of producing “virgin” materials by 80%.

Recyclable

The product can be fully recycled in the future. Having products and packaging that can be fully recycled not only helps divert waste from ending up in our environment but also leads to a reduction in energy consumption of new resources. Recycling 1 ton of aluminum can save 21 barrels of oil that otherwise would have been consumed.

GOTS Certified

The natural fibers used were grown in accordance with the Global Organic Textile Standards. In order to meet these standards companies follow strict environmental and ethical standards. In terms of environmental standards all dyestuffs, and chemical inputs cannot be toxic, must meet certain biodegradable standards and proper waste systems must be implemented.

Vegan

Products that do not contain any animal skins or animal by-product. Animal agriculture is one of the leading causes of greenhouse gas pollution in the world, not including animal skins or animal by-products that can have a significant positive impact on our environment.

Cruelty-Free

Products that have not been tested on animals. Not only do cruelty-free products not harm animals but they also tend to use fewer chemicals than their counterparts making them less harmful for us as well.

Artisanal

By utilizing handcrafted techniques, there are fewer emissions than mass-produced items, fashion is personal, the design process is valued, and will last a lifetime with its high-quality.

Recycled/Upcycled

Using recycled, upcycled, and vintage/deadstock fabrics. This gives materials a second life (or even third or fourth life) and utilizing any materials that would have otherwise ended up in landfills. Implementing recycled fabrics helps divert some of the 70 pounds of textile and clothing waste produced every year.

Fairtrade

Protects worker rights and ensures garment workers are given fair wages, under safe working conditions. Fairtrade not only has a strong ethical impact but an environmental one as well. Goods that are produced under fair trade regulations have to follow guidelines on environmental protection, including biodiversity protection, reduction of greenhouse gas, etc.

Zero Waste

This brand has shown that they divert excess materials from landfills by reusing or recycling. Implementing zero-waste patterning techniques can save up to 30% of fabric waste which would otherwise end up in landfills.

Reused

This item has been sourced second-hand, and either re-vamped or kept the same, giving it a new life. By giving an item a second life it helps keep some of the 70 pounds of clothes that end up in landfills every year. Additionally using reused items significantly lowers the vast amount of carbon emissions and water use that would be used in typical garment production.

Certified Organic

Using natural fibers that were not grown or treated with pesticides and/or other toxic chemicals that can harm human and environmental health. Implementing certified organic cotton vs conventional cotton reduces acidification potential by 70%, soil erosion potential by 26%, blue water consumption by 91% and primary energy demand by 62%.

RWS Certified Wool

The wool used was produced in accordance with the Responsible Wool Standard. In order to become certified by the Responsible Wool Standard farmers must meet the five freedoms of animal welfare which includes; freedom from hunger and thirst, discomfort, pain, fear and to express normal behaviors and farmers must follow strict land management rules.

Vegetarian

Products do not contain any animal skins. Animal agriculture is one of the leading causes of greenhouse gas pollution in the world, not including animal skins can have a significant positive impact on our environment. Conventional leather tanneries use 15k gallons of water per ton of leather and many hazardous chemicals such as chrome are used in production.

Palm Oil Free

Products do not contain any palm oil that causes deforestation. Palm oil production is a big cause of deforestation in our rainforests leading to the decline of many indigenous species and biodiversity. Palm oil is also a big cause of global warming accounting for 10% of global warming emissions.

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